Amir Eshel

Amir Eshel is Edward Clark Crossett Professor of Humanistic Studies, Professor of German Studies and Comparative Literature and an Affiliated Faculty at The Taube Center for Jewish Studies and The Europe Center at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. He is also the faculty director of Stanford’s research group on The Contemporary and of the Poetic Media Lab at Stanford’s Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis (CESTA). His research focuses on contemporary literature and the arts as they touch on memory, history, politics, and ethics.

Amir Eshel is the author of Poetic Thinking Today (forthcoming with Stanford University Press in 2019). Previous books include Futurity: Contemporary Literature and the Quest for the Past (The University of Chicago Press in 2013). The German version of the book, Zukünftigkeit: Die zeitgenössische Literatur und die Vergangenheit, appeared in 2012 with Suhrkamp Verlag. Together with Rachel Seelig, he co-edited The German-Hebrew Dialogue: Studies of Encounter and Exchange (2018). In 2014, he co-edited with Ulrich Baer a book of essays on Hannah Arendt, Hannah Arendt: zwischen den Disziplinen; and also co-edited a book of essays on Barbara Honigmann with Yfaat Weiss, Kurz hinter der Wahrheit und dicht neben der Lüge (2013).

Earlier scholarship includes the books Zeit der Zäsur: Jüdische Lyriker im Angesicht der Shoah (1999), and Das Ungesagte Schreiben: Israelische Prosa und das Problem der Palästinensischen Flucht und Vertreibung (2006). Amir Eshel has also published essays on Franz Kafka, Hannah Arendt, Paul Celan, Dani Karavan, Gerhard Richter, W.G. Sebald, Günter Grass, Alexander Kluge, Barbara Honigmann, Durs Grünbein, Dan Pagis, S. Yizhar, and Yoram Kaniyuk.

In 2018, with the artist Gerhard Richter, Amir Eshel published Zeichnungen/רישומים, a book which brings together 25 drawings by Richter from the clycle 40 Tage and Eshel’s bi-lingual poetry in Hebrew and German.

Amir Eshel is a recipient of fellowships from the Alexander von Humboldt and the Friedrich Ebert foundations and received the Award for Distinguished Teaching from the School of Humanities and Sciences.

Cody Chun

Cody Chun is a PhD candidate in English. His dissertation considers depictions of suffering and its transcendence in contemporary fiction. He co-coordinates “The Contemporary,” a DLCL-sponsored working group on contemporary literature, philosophy, and culture, and co-directs the Stanford Poetic Media Lab, a digital humanities research collective, within the Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis, committed to the production and use of digital technologies for pedagogical and research ends. He received his BA in English from the University of Puget Sound. 

Quinn Dombrowski

Quinn Dombrowski supports digitally-facilitated research in the DLCL as the Academic Technology Specialist.

She has been involved with digital humanities since 2004, working on a variety of projects including a medieval Russian database, a digital research environment for Bulgarian linguistics and folklore, a Drupal-based platform for developing digital catalogues raisonnés for art historians, and the financial papers of George Washington.

From 2008-2012, Quinn was on the program staff of the Mellon-funded digital humanities cyberinfrastructure initiative Project Bamboo. Her article “What Ever Happened to Project Bamboo?” reflects on the rise and fall of that effort.

Quinn was a co-founder of DHCommons, a directory of digital humanities projects with an overlay journal, and was the director of the DiRT (Digital Research Tools) directory from 2010 until 2017. She has served on the executive board of the Association for Computers and the Humanities from 2014-2018.

She is a co-editor of the Coding for Humanists series of practical, hands-on guides to digital humanities tools and technologies, and was the author of the inaugural volume, Drupal for Humanists. Her other book, Crescat Graffiti, Vita Excolatur, documents graffiti in the University of Chicago’s Regenstein library.

Quinn previously spent a decade working in central IT organizations at the University of Chicago and UC Berkeley, in various roles ranging from managing a scholarly communications group, coordinating digital humanities consulting, and supporting a high-performance computing cluster.

Quinn’s interests include the old Novgorod birchbark letters, digital humanities infrastructure, and failure. She helps wrangle the Stanford Digital Humanities website, and occasionally tweets at @quinnanya.