The Disenchantment of Science

Posted as part of the course “Myth and Modernity” taught in Spring 2020. The student who posted it has asked to remain anonymous. Recently, I was reading The Happiness Hypothesis, by Jonathan Haidt, and a quote from it caught my attention. Haidt writes: “In the late sixteenth century, European scientists began to look down on wonder; […]

Kleist, Knausgaard, Marsalis, Boland

Posted by Jamie Leonard ’21 as part of the course “Myth and Modernity” taught in Spring 2020. After our discussion on Thursday, what I took away from Kleist’s “The Earthquake” is the argument that events cannot be characterized according to a simple pattern of causation based on God’s interference in the human realm. Even if […]

Rilke: The Sublime and the Kitsch

Posted by Ravi Smith ’22 as part of the course “Myth and Modernity” taught in Spring 2020. This is a response to the discussion by Jamie and Greg on the post “Is Nemerov Rilkean?” First, to try to summarize a couple points from Greg’s comment: The sublime is what “pushes us to do is inhabit a state of […]

An Interpretation of a Dream

Posted by Nic Fort ’20 as part of the course “Myth and Modernity” taught in Spring 2020. I stand in the check-out line at a supermarket. Behind the cashier, light streams through the glass panes that line the front of the store. I reach the front of the line, unloading a pile of groceries, wine, […]

Do machines build humans?

Posted by Jason Zhao ’21 as part of the course “Myth and Modernity” taught in Spring 2020. I’ve really enjoyed all the interesting analyses of machines, AI, and technology as cultural phenomena rather than inert technical objects. I do think Kafka, intentionally or not, really provokes an interrogation of the relationship between humanity and technology: […]

Finding Poetry (& Possums)

During quarantine I haven’t had the same motivation to sit down and write poetry as I did while in a class but it seems like the quiet makes it easier to find poetry than before.